Tag: Add-ons

Keep your users informed with this new Alfresco Share add-on

A common request from clients is the ability to manage a simple set of system announcements which can be displayed on the Alfresco Share login page. These might be used to let everyone know about important events like an upcoming system outage or that there are cronuts in the breakroom.

This is a straightforwaShare Announcementsrd add-on to write, but I thought it might be useful to others, so I’ve packaged it as an open source add-on available on GitHub.

The idea is simple: When you install the module, it will automatically create a folder in the Data Dictionary called “Announcements”. Administrators will create one plain text file in that folder for every announcement. There is no custom content model or properties to mess with. The content of the file is the body of the announcement.

An Alfresco Share Extension Module does the work on the Share side. When a user opens the Share login page, a Share-tier web script calls a new announcements web script on the repo tier that returns the announcements as JSON. The Share extension formats the JSON response as an un-ordered list that gets injected into the login page between the Alfresco logo and the username/password fields.

When you are ready to take an announcement down an admin can either delete the announcement file or move the file to an arbitrary folder under “Announcements” to save for later reuse.

Some installations–like those with Single Sign-On enabled–never see the Alfresco login screen. For those installations, or for anyone that wants to expose the announcements to logged in users, the add-on also includes an announcements dashlet.

Announcements DashletHopefully you’ll find this useful. If you find issues or want to make enhancements, pull requests are always welcome.

A simple one-way calendar integration for Alfresco Share

Photo credit: Dafne Cholet
Photo credit: Dafne Cholet

A common request is to integrate the Alfresco Share calendar with an external calendaring system such as Outlook, Google Calendar, or Zimbra. Without an integration, people end up doing double-entry. You’ve already got a calendar that works pretty well. Why make people re-enter events in Alfresco Share?

Most people use Alfresco Share for team collaboration. The calendar doesn’t need to show everything on everyone’s calendar–that job is better left to the existing calendar server. What makes more sense is to show a few team-related events or milestones on the team’s Alfresco Share site calendar or maybe in a dashlet on the site’s dashboard.

When thinking about the problem, I realized that the calendar in Share is just another interested party in an event. Just as some calendaring systems allow you to “invite” a conference room to a meeting which effectively reserves that room for the meeting, you ought to be able to “invite” a Share site and have the Share site add that event to its calendar and update it when the event changes.

Treating the Share site as just another invitee is a non-invasive way to integrate with the calendaring system and it has the added benefit that only events in which the Share site was specifically invited will show up on the Share site calendar.

As luck would have it, the pieces to make this work already exist and they don’t require any changes to the source calendaring system. Check it out:

  • When you invite someone to a calendar event the calendaring system sends an iCalendar (.ICS) file as an email attachment to the invitee. The invitee’s email or calendaring client recognizes that attachment and updates the calendar accordingly.
  • There’s a Java library called iCal4j that knows how to parse iCalendar files. Yea for standards!
  • Alfresco supports receiving inbound email and you can easily bind custom logic to the creation of nodes. Alfresco creates one document for the email body and one for the ICS file attachment.
  • Events that show up on the Alfresco Share calendar are just content-less objects–they are instances of ia:calendarEvent.

Put those pieces together and a simple one-way calendar integration is born. The integration watches for incoming email with ICS attachments, parses the attachment, then creates, updates, or deletes the corresponding Alfresco Share site calendar object.

With this in place, all you have to do to add an event to the Alfresco Share site calendar is invite the Share site to the event from your favorite calendaring system.

But what’s the invitee name of a Share site? Great question! In Alfresco, there’s an aspect called email alias. You can add it to any folder and give it an arbitrary value. Then, when sending email to Alfresco you can specify the alias.

My integration includes code that makes sure all Share sites have a folder that can be used to store inbound email and it gives that folder an alias equal to the Share site’s short name (which is used as part of the Share URL). So if your Share site is called “test-site-1” and you normally send email to Alfresco via alfresco.someco.com, your Share site’s email address becomes test-site-1@alfresco.someco.com.

What about updates? Calendar systems have a universal identifier for every event. When calendar entries are updated or deleted, the calendaring system sends an iCalendar file just as it does for new events. Included in that file is the event’s unique ID and a flag that indicates whether the event is being created or deleted. When the integration creates the event in the Alfresco Share calendar, it stores the unique ID in the Alfresco object’s metadata which it can use later to match up subsequent update and delete requests.

How about a demo?

This video shows the integration in action. Be sure to make it full screen and select “HD”.

(If you can’t see the video, watch it on YouTube here).

What’s left to do?

This is a simple, one-way integration. It does not tell the corporate calendaring system which sites are available and it does not do a free-busy lookup. It also does not acknowledge the invitation back to the source calendaring system. I don’t consider these to be critical gaps but those features might make the integration tighter.

As a side-note, the automatic creation of an email alias for a Share site and a corresponding folder to hold inbound email (which users could then configure rules for) might be useful as a separate add-on even if you don’t need calendar integration. If you agree, let me know. Maybe the integration ought to be split into two separate AMPs.

Pull requests welcome

As usual, I welcome your participation on this project. If you find problems, fix problems, or want to make improvements, use the github project to create issues and pull requests.

Combine the qualitative and the quantitative with Alfresco and Pentaho

Yesterday we had our monthly Tech Talk Live session. The topic was “Business Intelligence for ECM Practitioners” and it was all about how BI can be applied to the data that lives in your Alfresco repository. We were joined on the panel by Francesco Corti, who is experienced in both ECM and BI, as well as John Iball, the product manager for Alfresco One.

Here is the broadcast in case you missed it:

During the broadcast we saw Francesco’s AAAR solution which extracts data from Alfresco and puts in a data warehouse. Pentaho, an open source Business Intelligence platform, is then used to create a dynamic dashboard that end users can use to interactively answer business questions about that data. Francesco showed a live demo of reporting using Alfresco auditing data, but with his CMIS connector for Pentaho, you could report on anything stored in the repository.

John Iball shared with us that reporting and analytics was one of the top features requested during a recent discussion with 70 or so Alfresco customers. Rather than very basic reporting features, John said that customers want the ability to do deeper analytics on the data stored in Alfresco. Some will already have BI platforms in place. Others will benefit from a complete solution. Either way, John says that meeting this need is high on Alfresco’s roadmap right now.

About Tech Talk Live

Tech Talk Live occurs on the first Wednesday of every month barring a holiday or some other conflict. During each episode, the Alfresco community team focuses on a specific topic and invites panelists from Alfresco, partners, and the broader community to take part in the conversation. The session is broadcast to the public live on Google Hangouts on Air with Q&A taking place simultaneously in #alfresco on freenode IRC. Check the wiki for links to prior and future episodes. The Alfresco events page also has entries for Tech Talk Live.

Our next episode will be on March 5 when Nathan McMinn joins us to recap some of the killer projects that were created during the Alfresco Summit 2013 hack-a-thon.

List of Alfresco Dashlet Challenge 2011 Entries

The Alfresco Dashlet Challenge contest has been over for quite a while and our winner, Florian Maul, has received his iPad and has already racked up some impressive Fruit Ninja scores, but I’m just now getting around to posting the entire list of entries. I’ve put the list on the Alfresco wiki.

Please do take a look at these projects and try them in your own installations. In many cases, it’s a single JAR you drop in, then restart and you’re done. If you find problems, don’t hesitate to log issues or maybe even crack open your editor, fix it, and contribute it back to the author.

I should take this opportunity to mention a little project we’ve got brewing. If you’ve heard any of my “State of the Community” talks you may already know about Alfresco Add-Ons. It’s a site we’re building that will do a better job of helping you find and rate add-ons the community is creating for the Alfresco platform. An Add-On might be a dashlet, like the Dashlet Challenge entries, or it might be an integration, or an API, or just about anything else that works with Alfresco.

Add-Ons isn’t meant to be a project hosting site. There are already a lot of those available. Instead, think of it as a directory or index with some social features to help the cream rise to the top. This will give everyone (Community & Enterprise users) a one-stop shop for add-ons and extensions.

We’re hoping to have a minimum viable product ready by DevCon. If it gets done and enough people want to see it, we’ll have an ad hoc session so we can look at it together. We’d obviously like to get feedback from the community for the next sprint.