Tag: Liferay

Can GateIn, the new JBoss Portal/eXo Portal combination, outshine Liferay?

I know I’m way behind on this. I’m kind of surprised at how little attention it has received. Maybe I need to refresh my portal-based news feeds. In any case, earlier this Summer, JBoss and eXo announced they would be combining the JBoss Portlet Container with eXo Portal to create a new project called GateIn. Other than the similarity between the concepts “portal” and “gate” I’m not sure what they are going for with the name, but don’t let that throw you off. To get an idea of what it’s about, check out the demo.

Most of our clients looking for open source Java portals have been interested in either JBoss Portal or Liferay. In choosing between the two, one consideration was that, historically, JBoss Portal has been less about out-of-the-box portlets and flashy UI and more about providing a presentation framework. Clients developing solutions that were really 100% custom apps with a portal-like interface leaned toward JBoss Portal (especially if they were already a JBoss shop). Clients looking for more of an “instant community” with ease-of-use on the configuration side and a large number of out-of-the-box portlets leaned more toward Liferay. GateIn appears to be a big step forward for JBoss Portal in terms of the user experience for portal administration and makes JBoss Portal about more than just a framework for presentation services.

Beyond requiring a great user experience for both end users (site consumers) and portal administrators (content managers), portals must also have a fast and intuitive development model. I think this is especially true lately as lighter-weight presentation frameworks have become more popular. As the difference in capabilities between portal and non-portal presentation frameworks becomes less and less, portals can’t afford to offer a soul-sucking development experience.

I haven’t spent any time customizing GateIn so I can’t comment on the developer experience. What I do know is that when you move from developing code using lightweight frameworks like Drupal or Django to Java portal servers like Liferay, you feel the increased complexity immediately. Anti-Java-ites will say that a lot of the complexity in the development experience is there because it’s Java and it will always be that way. I don’t think that’s true–look at frameworks like Grails and Wicket.

The point is, for GateIn to be a serious challenger to Liferay, they’ll need to provide not only the eye candy on the front-end, but also a developer experience that approaches the productivity level we can get with non-portal frameworks. If they can do that, they have a chance against Liferay. Of course even if they manage to do that, they are still up against the “Do we really need a portal server to do this?” undercurrent that threatens both projects. But that’s another blog post.

Review: Liferay Portal 5.2 Systems Development, by Jonas X. Yuan

I’ve just finished Jonas X. Yuan’s book, Liferay Portal 5.2 Systems Development and I thought I’d share a few thoughts.

First, I should probably get this out of the way: Jonas works for Cignex, which, from time to time, competes for business with my firm, Optaros. Okay, back to the book…

My overall impression of this book is that it essentially documents the work Jonas and his team did for one of their clients. While it is great that their project was broad enough to generate enough material to be compiled into a book, I felt like I was reading “here’s what we did on our project” instead of “let me teach you how to do Liferay development”.

When I read a technical book, I like to read about concepts and how I might apply those in different situations, and then dive into a realistic application of that concept. This book definitely covers realistic examples–the screenshots are lifted right out of the solution Jonas and his team built for their client. And I like that the example is fairly consistent throughout the book. But I found it very light on context and concepts. That left me feeling a bit disoriented as Jonas jumped from detail to detail with very little being done to set the scene. A simple explanation of “Why are we doing this?” would have been a big help.

Another thing that made this a tough read for me is that there are many grammatical issues with the text. If this were in one or two places, you could rightly accuse me of being a hard-grading Grandson of an English teacher (which I am). Unfortunately the problem isn’t limited to one or two places–there’s one on nearly every page. I don’t blame Jonas for this, I blame the editor. Is the pressure to publish on schedule so great that there is no time to perform even rudimentary grammar checks for things like missing articles?

If you can get past the style, there are good takeaways in the book. You’ll learn:

  • The difference between building customizations in ext versus plugins
  • How to use ServiceBuilder
  • How to build portlets using Struts and Tiles
  • How to extend the Journal CMS with structures and templates
  • How to build and customize themes and layout templates

There’s a chapter on Liferay’s Social Office and how it works behind the scenes, including details on Inter-Portlet Communication. Jonas has also included a chapter on moving content between multiple environments (Staging/Production) which is an area where portals are often less than optimal.

There is a lot of code included in the book and available for download. Several of the code snippets in the book need to be debugged before they will run properly, but most are easily worked through. The book suggests working with the Liferay source from HEAD, but I had to use the 5.2.3 tag to get the ServiceBuilder stuff to work correctly.

While this book isn’t for everyone, I’m glad Jonas wrote it. Liferay is a complex piece of software and the community needs all the documentation help it can get.

Yet another reason to love Open Source Content Management

Man, I don’t miss delivering solutions on top of Documentum. After reading Laurence Hart’s post on Documentum Developer Edition, I’m reminded how much I take for granted working exclusively in the open source content management world.

Laurence’s post was intended to discuss the ins and outs of Documentum’s efforts to make it easier for developers, and, as usual, he’s done a good job of that. But it also underscores the benefits enjoyed by those who work in open source land. In case you don’t know how good you’ve got it, my open source brothers and sisters, check it out:

Developers working with closed source ECM vendors have to pay to get the software

As Laurence points out,

“There are lots of independent consultants out there that have trouble keeping-up with the technology because they can’t afford to become partners for the requisite fee.”

If you are a developer looking to go deep on closed source software, you have no choice but to pay. There’s no other way to get access to the software. Sometimes you can’t even get access to the documentation or the bug database without a paid-up partner account (or a client that lets you use theirs).

[UPDATE: Jerry Silver, from EMC, points out that the Documentum Developer Edition is a free download. My original post made it sound like you had to be part of the partner program to obtain the download.]

With open source, the barrier to entry is much lower. You pay nothing to get the software. It’s all about the time and energy you put into learning the product and implementing cool solutions.

To be fair, commercial open source vendors often charge partner fees as well, but the bottom line is that it costs nothing to get started with the code.

Developers working with closed source ECM vendors struggle with giant developer footprints

I feel sorry for Laurence’s laptop:

“The complete Development install calls for 3GB of RAM (after a 1.7+GB download).  That is no small thing for a development laptop.  It needs to be on a newer machine.  If you can move the database service to a different box, that will make your life easier.”

Oh dear. A 1.7GB download for a developer setup? Am I downloading a VM image or a content management server? Let’s look at Alfresco for a comparison. Assuming you are starting from scratch, and assuming you are going to go full-on with the Alfresco platform, your total download is right around 300MB. That includes:

  • Alfresco SDK
  • Alfresco WAR
  • Alfresco WCM (Deployment listener and add-on to core repo)
  • Apache Tomcat
  • Sun JDK
  • MySQL (Server and connector)

All of which runs comfortably in 2GB of RAM and won’t even cause your fan to kick on in 4GB.

Developers working with closed source ECM vendors have less choice

Optaros consultants are now split fairly evenly in their choice of OS across Windows, Mac OS X, and some flavor of Linux. Some people prefer MySQL and some prefer PostgreSQL. Mostly we use Eclipse for Java development but everyone’s got a preference. I use Tomcat for everything locally while others like JBoss. The point is, developers want to use their tools the way they want to. It’s not a stubbornness thing it’s an efficiency thing.

Within my CMS I want the same flexibility. I want to tweak settings. I want to name my database what I want. I want the flexibility to deploy across as many (or as few) nodes as I need to. From Laurence’s post, it sounds like Documentum clearly falls down here.

Developers working with closed source ECM vendors can’t see the code

It’s obvious, I know. For developers that work with open source it is extremely natural to use the CMS source code when debugging or for reference. You don’t even think about it–it’s just there and you use it. Imagine the frustration of someone who works with closed source CMS who has to routinely decompile classes to figure out what’s going on. That truly sucks. What good is a “Developer Edition” that doesn’t come with source code?

Partner defections from closed source are on the rise

I’ve seen recent announcements from multiple partners who were previously exclusive to closed source vendors but are now adding open source to their partner list. This is a reflection of increasing demand by customers who are realizing the business value of open source, especially in tough economic times as well as partners’ desire to make up for sagging demand in the proprietary world. But could it also be that more firms are realizing how much more productive and pleasant it is to work with open source content management?

Help your employer/client see the light

Open source ECM technologies like Alfresco, Drupal, Liferay, Lucene, and many others, are now at or beyond their closed source equivalents. If you are a developer who’s sick of the shackles closed source CMS places on you, why not suggest exploring open source alternatives?

Notes from OSCON 2009 in San Jose

I’m back from San Jose. My colleage, Dave Gynn, and I had fun at the O’Reilly Open Source Conference (OSCON) and learned a lot. Dave’s ability to pick out open source rockstars from a crowd is uncanny. It was pretty sweet seeing Larry Wall (and his family) hanging out and then hearing him speak. Although there are all kinds of topics on all things Open Source, the conference does have a heavy Perl bias.

Dave and I decided we were glad we went but we don’t feel like we have to be there every year going forward. This was my first time, but Dave said the general excitement level seemed low for some reason. Maybe it was Allison Randal’s seriously downbeat welcome address. Not sure. Anyway, here are my rough notes from some of the sessions I attended…

“Open Source in Government” was a big theme at OSCON this year. Speakers tried to instill a sense of urgency in the audience by saying that the window of opportunity for getting the government behind open source in a big way will only be open for a few more months. If you want to get involved, check out some of these links:

Data.gov mash-up contest

Machine readable datasets from the US Govt

Help the government make better use of open source

Some folks from Liferay presented on a new UI framework they’ve created called Alloy. Alloy is aimed at providing a single framework that addresses HTML, CSS, and JavaScript in a way that is abstracted from the underlying libraries. Alloy basically extends/subclasses JQuery and YUI. Liferay is migrating a lot of their OOTB portlets now to the new framework. It is expected to ship as part of 5.3. This talk was more about the “why” and less about the “what”. I would have liked to see more examples/demos.

Went to a talk on “using Django for election audits” that turned out to be more about how screwed up our elections process is and the minutiae of performing an audit on election results with not so much on how Django was used to solve the problem. The speaker did give a shout out to the Django Debug Toolbar that might prove to be useful. The presenter is looking for help with the project. He needs everything from UI help to people who can send him election results from their local election boards.

Saw a decent talk on Apache CouchDB. Couch is a schema-less database that is built for massive distributed scalability. Instead of SQL you use map-reduce functions to query. Key to Couch is the concept of “eventual consistency”–in a Couch app, data can be consistent over time instead of right now. Couch always knows either the correct old value or the correct current value, but it may take time to propogate the current value to every node in the system.

Noteworthy bullet points:

  • Couch can idle in 4MB of RAM. With a couple of production databases Couch will use about 20MB.
  • Canonical is including Couch in the Karmic Koala release. This will give apps running on Karmic the ability to easily sync data between nodes. Couch will also be running as part of Ubuntu One which means Karmic desktops can sync data with the Ubuntu cloud (See the Ubuntu wiki).
  • Someone is currently working on a JavaScript implementation of Couch. Among other things, this would give you the ability to replicate your CouchDB to a local version of Couch running in someone’s browser.
  • Current ACL is limited to “you are either an admin or you aren’t”. ACL for writers *might* make it into 1.0. ACL for readers won’t.

I went to the “JRuby on AppEngine” talk not for the JRuby, but because it was the only Google AppEngine session I could find. I was looking for some factoids on who’s using AppEngine. Here’s what they said:

  • 200,000 registered developers
  • 85,000 applications
  • Household names such as: eBay, Best Buy, Forbes, Whitehouse.gov.

Whitehouse.gov was a cool scalability story for AppEngine. They used AppEngine to moderate questions submitted during Obama’s first online town hall. According to the Google Code blog,

“During the 48-hour open voting period, the site peaked at 700 hits per second, and 92,934 people submitted 104,073 questions and cast 3,605,984 votes. In total, over one million unique visitors visited the site before the town hall. Even while the site was featured on major news outlets and even the Google homepage the other 50,000 apps built on App Engine were fully supported and experienced no adverse effects.”

The Erlang talk provided a good history of the language. I would have liked more on the language itself and less of the detailed history behind Ericsson’s telecom switches (even though Erlang played a critical role in those products). I was aware that CouchDB is built with Erlang but the speaker mentioned a couple of other open source projects that leverage Erlang that I hadn’t heard of: ejabberd is an Erlang-based chat server and RabbitMQ is an Erlang-based messaging server.

The “building a business on an open source distributed cloud” talk by Bradford Stephens was good. The speaker’s company, Visible Technologies, mines social networks and the internet in general for consumer sentiment on its customer’s brands. Their system ingests vast subsets of the Internet, parses the results, processes it, and indexes it so that they can run analytics against it for their clients. They moved from an all-Microsoft stack to an open source stack and have been very happy with it.

This was the third “noSQL”-themed talk I saw. He made a good point that when we design apps, we should be saying, “I need persistence” and then figure out what is the best provider of that given scalability and other constraints rather than starting out with “I need a relational database”.

The open source stack used by Visible Technologies includes the usual search players (Lucene, Nutch, Solr) as well as one I haven’t heard of: Katta is used to shard large Lucene indexes across multiple servers. They also use a couple of Hadoop sub-projects, HBase and ZooKeeper, and several others.

The New York Times API and NPR API talks were very good. I didn’t realize how many different API’s NYT has exposed. You can check out their API’s around people, news, search, movies, and books at http://developer.nytimes.com. Their blog is also worth checking out.

Lots of apps have been built using the NYT API. A personal favorite is InstantWatcher. It is a mash-up of NYT’s movies API with Netflix that helps you find good movies available to watch instantly.

NPR’s talk focused less on their specific API and more on how it is being used. Noteworthy bullets:

  • You can build API calls with their query generator (requires a free API key) or by hand (doc).
  • NPR offers tiered key levels. If you create something cool and drive a little traffic their way, you can get your key upgraded to a higher tier.
  • There are no rate limits. NPR believes they have built an infrastructure that can take “anything we can throw at it”.
  • The API has 2,000 users and serves 24 million requests (per ?) averaging 2 million requests per month.
  • 50% of the API requests are for NPRML with less than 0.1% requesting ATOM. NPR API results are also available as JSON, RSS, and several other formats.
  • The NPR Digital Media team blogs at http://www.npr.org/blogs/inside/
  • Interesting side-note: NPR is currently migrating off of Oracle 10g to MySQL

After the NYT and NPR talks, they held a developer meet-up of sorts. Unfortunately I had to head to the airport so I missed out on that.

Alfresco User Interface: What are my options?

People often need to build a custom user interface on top of the Alfresco repository and I see a lot of people asking general questions about how to do it. There are lots of options to consider. Here are four options for creating a user interface on top of Alfresco, at a high level:

Option 1: Use your favorite programming language and/or framework to talk to Alfresco via REST or Web Services. PHP? Python? Java? Flex? Whatever, it’s up to you. The REST API is nice because if you can’t find a URL that does what you need it to out-of-the-box, you can always roll-your-own with the web script framework. This option offers the most flexibility and creative freedom, but of course you might end up building constructs or components that you may have gotten “for free” from a higher-level framework. Optaros‘ streamlined web client, DoCASU, built on Ext-JS, is one freely-available example of a custom UI on top of Alfresco but there are others.

Option 2: Use Alfresco’s Surf framework. Alfresco’s Surf framework is just that–it’s a framework. Don’t confuse it with Alfresco Share which is a team-centric collaboration client built on top of Surf. And, don’t assume that just because a piece of functionality is in Share it is available to you in the lower-level Surf framework. You may have to do some extra work to get some of the cool stuff in Share to work in your pure Surf app. Also realize that Surf is brand new and still maturing. You’ll be quickly disappointed if you hold it to the same standard as a more widely-used, well-established framework like Seam or Django. Surf is a good option for quick, Alfresco-centric solutions, especially if you think you might want to leverage Alfresco’s browser-based site assembly tool, Web Studio, at some point in the future. (See Do-it-yourself Alfresco Surf Code Camp).

Option 3: Customize the Alfresco “Explorer” web client. There are varying degrees to which you can customize the web client. On one end of the spectrum you’ve got Freemarker “presentation templates” followed closely by XML configuration. On the other end of the spectrum you’ve got more elaborate enhancements you can make using JavaServer Faces (JSF). Customizing the Alfresco Explorer web client should only be considered if you can keep your enhancements to an absolute minimum because:

  1. Alfresco is moving away from JSF in favor of Surf-based clients. The Explorer client will continue to be around, but I wouldn’t expect major efforts to be focused on that client going forward.
  2. JSF-based customizations of the web client can be time-consuming and potentially complex, particularly if you are new to JSF.
  3. For most solutions, you’ll get more customer satisfaction bang out of your coding buck by building a purpose-built, eye-catching, UI designed with your specific use cases in mind than you will by starting with the general-purpose web client and extending from there.

Option 4: Use a portal, community, or WCM platform. This includes PHP-based projects like Drupal (Drupal CMIS Screencast) or Joomla as well as Java-based projects like Liferay and JBoss Portal. This is a good option if you have requirements that match up well with the built-in (or easily added-on) capabilities of those platforms.

It’s worth talking about Java portal servers specifically. I think people are struggling a bit to find The Best Way to integrate Alfresco with a portal. Of course there probably is no single approach that will fit every situation but I think Alfresco (with help from the community) could do more to provide best practices.

Here are the options you have when integrating with a portal:

Portal Option 1: Configure Alfresco to be the replacement JSR-170 repository for the portal. This option seems like more trouble than it is worth. If all you need is what you can get out of JSR-170, you might as well use the already-integrated Jackrabbit repository that most open source portals ship with these days unless you have good reasons not to. I’m open to having my mind changed on this one, but it seems like if you want to use Alfresco and a portal, you’ve got bigger plans that are probably going to require custom portlets anyway.

Portal Option 2: Run Alfresco and the portal in the same JVM (post). This is NOT recommended if you need to scale beyond a small departmental solution and, really, I think with the de-coupling of the web script engine we should consider this one deprecated at this point.

Portal Option 3: Run the Alfresco web script engine and the portal in the same JVM. Like the previous option, this gives you the ability to write web scripts that are wrapped in a portlet but it cuts down on the size of the web app significantly and it frees up your portal to scale independently of the Alfresco repository tier. It’s a fast development cycle once you get it set up. But I haven’t seen great instructions for setting it up yet. Alfresco should document this on their wiki if they are going to support this pattern.

Portal Option 4: Write your own portlets that make services calls. This is the “cleanest” approach because it treats Alfresco like any other back-end you might want to integrate with from the portal. You write custom portlets and have them talk to Alfresco via REST or SOAP. You’ll have to decide how you want to handle authentication with Alfresco.

What about CMIS?

CMIS fits under the “Option 1: Use your favorite programming language” and “Portal Option 4: Write your own portlets” categories. You can make CMIS calls to Alfresco using both REST and SOAP from your own custom code, portlet or otherwise. The nice thing about CMIS is that you can use it to abstract the underlying repository so that (in theory) your front-end code will work with different CMIS-compliant back-ends. Just realize that CMIS isn’t a fully-ratified standard yet and although a CMIS implementation is in the Enterprise version of Alfresco, it isn’t clear to me whether or not you’d be supported if you had a problem. (The last response I saw on this specific question was a Peter Monks tweet saying, “I don’t think so”).

The CMIS standard should be approved by the end-of-the-year and if Alfresco’s past performance is an indicator of the future, they’ll be the first to market with a production-ready, fully-supported CMIS implementation based on the final spec.

Pick your poison

Those are the options as I see them. Each one has trade-offs. Some may become more or less attractive over time as languages, frameworks, and the state of the art evolve. Ultimately, you’re going to have to evaluate which one fits your situation the best. You may have a hard time making a decision, but you have to admit that having to choose from several options is a nice problem to have.

Running Alfresco web scripts as Liferay portlets

I’ve seen a lot of Liferay and Alfresco forum posts from people having trouble getting Alfresco running within a Liferay portal. Once that’s done, people usually want to invoke Alfresco web scripts as portlets without requiring a separate single sign-on (SSO) infrastructure. Some people have pointed to the Alfresco wiki (Deploying 2.1 WAR Liferay 4.3). That is a helpful reference but it isn’t the full story. Here are some notes that may help.

1. Download the Liferay 4.3.6 + Tomcat 5.5 JDK5 bundle. I had mixed results with the latest release 4.4.2. You may be tempted to try to download the WAR-only distribution and configure it in your existing Tomcat instance. In this case, save yourself the time and headache and get the bundle. Fool with the WAR distribution later.

2. Unpack the Liferay distribution and fire it up. Make sure you can log in as the test@liferay.com (password: test) user to validate that all is well with the Liferay install.

2a. Create a test user. (“Create Account” on the Liferay login screen). Remember the email address. This will matter shortly. For this discussion I’ll assume Foo User with a screen name of fuser and an email address of fuser@foo.com. Make sure you create a home directory. In this example, we’ll call it “fuser”.

2b. Verify that you can log in as your test user.

3. Shut down the server.

4. Download Alfresco 2.1.2 Enterprise, WAR only. Alfresco 2.1.1 has a known issue (AWC-1686) with the way authentication is handled for web scripts in the context of Liferay so make sure you are using 2.1.2.

5. Expand the Alfresco 2.1.2 WAR into the Tomcat webapps/alfresco directory (which you’ll have to create the first time). If you are tweaking the install (such as pointing to a specific MySQL database, using something other than MySQL, pointing to a different data directory, etc.) make sure you have copied your good set of extensions into Tomcat’s shared/classes/alfresco/extension directory.

6. Copy the MySQL connector into Tomcat’s common/lib directory.

7. Start Tomcat. When it comes up, you’ll have Liferay running and you’ll have Alfresco running, but Liferay doesn’t yet know about Alfresco. Verify that you can log in to Alfresco as admin.

7a. While you are here, create a test user account. You need to create a user account that has an email address that matches the test user account you created in Liferay. In this example you created Foo User with a screen name of fuser and an email address of fuser@foo.com so you need to create an Alfresco user with the same settings. You’ll log in to Alfresco as fuser. You’ll log in to Liferay as fuser@foo.com.

7b. Verify that you can log in to Alfresco as fuser.

8. Shut down Tomcat.

9. Now you need to configure Alfresco as a Liferay plug-in. This involves adding four files to Alfresco’s WEB-INF directory: liferay-display.xml, liferay-plugin-package.xml, liferay-portlet.xml, and portlet.xml. Why aren’t these available in the Alfresco source or on the wiki? Apparently someone tried to address this at some point because there is a link on the wiki but it is broken. Until that’s addressed, I’ve put them here.

10. Remove the portlet-api-lib.jar file from Alfresco’s WEB-INF/lib directory.

11. Re-package alfresco.war. It is now ready to hand over to Liferay.

12. Start Tomcat.

13. Find your Liferay deploy directory. If you are running out-of-the-box on Linux, Liferay’s “deploy” directory is called liferay/deploy and it resides in the home directory of the user who started Tomcat. I’m running it as root so my Liferay deploy directory is /root/liferay/deploy.

14. Copy the alfresco.war you just created into the deploy directory. Watch the log. You should see Liferay working on the WAR. He’s finding the plug-in config files and essentially deploying the Alfresco portlets.

15. Now log in to Liferay using the Liferay admin account (test@liferay.com). Go to a page, then use the global navigation dropdown to select “Add Content”. The list of portlets should appear and you should see the “Alfresco” category. If you don’t, look at the log because something is amiss. Add the My Spaces portlet to the page. You may see an error at this point but ignore it. The problem is you probably don’t have a user in Alfresco that has an email address of “test@liferay.com”, which is the currently-logged in user.

16. Log out.

17. Log in as your test user that exists in both Alfresco and Liferay (fuser@foo.com).

18. Go to the page. You should see the “My Spaces” portlet. You should be able to upload content, create spaces, etc.

Exposing your own web scripts as portlets

All Alfresco web scripts are automatically exposed as JSR-168 portlets, including the ones you create. To add your web scripts as portlets, first make sure you have authentication set to “user” and transaction set to “required” in your web script’s descriptor. Then, update portlet.xml, liferay-portlet.xml, and liferay-display.xml. Follow the pattern that’s in those files already and you’ll be fine. For example, if you deploy the Hello World web script from my web script tutorial, you need to add a new portlet to portlet.xml with a “scriptUrl” like: /alfresco/168s/someco/helloworld?name=jeff. Then you update liferay-portlet.xml and liferay-display.xml with the new portlet name or portlet ID.

Single sign-on with no single sign-on?

The web script runtime has a JSR-168 authenticator. So when your web scripts get invoked by the portlet, the current credentials are passed in. That’s why your web script can run without requiring an additional sign in. Prior to this being put in place, people had to implement Yale CAS (or an equivalent) to get SSO between Liferay and Alfresco web scripts.

What’s not covered in these instructions is that you’ll probably want to (1) configure both Alfresco and Liferay to authenticate against LDAP and (2) change the configuration of either Alfresco or Liferay to use the same credential (either username or email address) for both systems so that if you do have users logging in to both, they don’t have to remember that one requires the full email address but the other doesn’t.


If you see one of the Alfresco portlets displaying “Data is not currently available” or somesuch, try hitting
Alfresco in another tab. Log in, then log out. Then go back to the
portal and open the page again. It should work now. I’m not sure what’s going on there. I think it may have to do with me switching back-and-forth between Liferay instances (4.3.2 versus 4.4.2) so maybe you won’t see it.

Open issues

You may see an error like this:

21:22:15,965 WARN [BaseDeployer:1038] Unable to format /usr/local/bin/liferay-4.3.6/temp/20080408212212978/WEB-INF/faces-config-jbpm.xml: Error on line 5 of document file:///usr/local/bin/liferay-4.3.6/temp/20080408212212978/WEB-INF/faces-config-jbpm.xml : A ‘)’ is required in the declaration of element type “application”. Nested exception: A ‘)’ is required in the declaration of element type “application”.

I haven’t chased that down yet. I’ll update this post with a comment when I find out. I’m sure fixing that will also fix the problem that you’ll see if you try to start an advanced workflow from a piece of content displayed in the My Spaces portlet.

I was also seeing an error when trying to use the “Add Content” link in the straight Alfresco client. I think it is JSF-related. Again, I’ll update this post with a comment when it is resolved (or when I find a Jira ticket).