Category: Alfresco Developer Series

The Alfresco Developer Series is a set of articles aimed at getting you up-to-speed on the Alfresco platform.

5 rules you must follow on every Alfresco project

I know that people are often thrown into an Alfresco project having never worked with it before. And I know that the platform is broad and the learning curve is steep. But there are some rules you simply have to follow when you make customizations or you could be creating a costly mess.

The single most important one is to use the extension mechanism. Let me convince you why it’s so important, then I’ll list the rest of the top five rules you must follow when customizing Alfresco.

All-too-often, people jump right in to hacking the files that are part of the distributed WARs. I see examples of it in the forums and other community channels and I see it in client projects. Not every once-in-a-while. All. Of. The. Time.

If you’ve stumbled on to this blog post because you are embarking on your first Alfresco project, let this be the one thing you take to heart: The extension mechanism is not optional. You must use it. If you ignore this advice and begin making changes to the files shipped with Alfresco you are entering a world of pain.

The extension points in Alfresco allow you to change just about every aspect of Alfresco Share and the underlying repository without touching a single file shipped with the product. And you can do so in a way that can be repeated as you move from environment to environment or when you need to re-apply your customizations after an upgrade.

“But I am too busy,” you say. “This needs to be done yesterday!”, you say. “I know JavaScript. I’m just going to make some tweaks to these components and that’s it. What’s the big deal?”

Has your Saturday Morning Self ever been really angry at things your Friday Night Self did without giving much consideration to the consequences? That’s what you’re doing when you start making changes to those files directly. Yes, it works, but you’ll be sorry eventually.

As soon as you change one of those files you’ve made it difficult or impossible to reliably set up the same software given a clean WAR. This makes it hard to:

  • Migrate your code, because it is hard to tell what’s changed across the many nooks and crannies of the Alfresco and Share WARs.
  • Determine whether problems you are seeing are Alfresco bugs or your bugs, because you can’t easily remove your customizations to get back to a vanilla distribution.
  • Perform upgrades, because you can’t simply drop in the new WARs and re-apply your customizations.

People ask for best practices around customizing Alfresco. Using the extension mechanism isn’t a “best practice”–it’s a rule. It’s like saying “Don’t cross the foul line” is a “best practice” when bowling. It’s not a best practice, it’s a rule.

So, to repeat, the first rule that you have to abide by is:

  1. Use the extension mechanism. Don’t touch a single file that was shipped inside alfresco.war or share.war. If you think you need to make a customization that requires you to do that I can almost guarantee you are doing it wrong. The official docs explain how to develop extensions.

Rounding out the top five:

  1. Get your own content model. Don’t add to Alfresco’s out-of-the-box content model XML or the examples that ship with the product. And don’t just copy-and-paste other models you find in tutorials. Those are just examples, people!
  2. Get your own namespace. Stay out of Alfresco’s namespace altogether. Don’t put your own web scripts in the existing Alfresco web script package structure. Don’t put your Java classes in Alfresco’s package structure. It’s called a “namespace”. It’s for your name and it keeps your stuff separate from everyone else’s.
  3. Package your customizations as an AMP. Change the structure of the AMP if you want–the tool allows that–but use an AMP. Seriously, I know there are problems with AMPs, but this is what we’re all using these days in the Alfresco world. Ideally you’ll have one for your “repo” tier changes and one for your “share” tier changes. An AMP gives you a nice little bundle you can hand to an Alfresco administrator and simply say, “Apply this AMP” and they’ll know exactly what to do with it.
  4. Create a repeatable build for your project. I don’t care what you use to do this, just use something, anything, to automate your build. If a blindfolded monkey can’t produce a working AMP from your source code you’re not done setting up your project yet. It’s frustrating that this has to be called out, because it should be as natural to a developer as breathing, but, alas, it does.

The Alfresco Maven SDK can really help you with all of these. If you use it to bootstrap your project, and then only make changes to the files in your project, you’re there. If you need help getting started with the Alfresco Maven SDK, read this.

These are the rules. They are non-negotiable. The rest of your code can be on the front page of The Daily WTF but if you stick to these rules at a minimum, you, your team, and everyone that comes after you will lead a much less stressful existence.

You might also be interested in my presentation, “What Every Developer Should Know About Alfresco“. And take a look at the lightning talk Peter Monks gave at last year’s Alfresco Summit which covers advice for building Alfresco modules.

 

How I successfully studied for the Alfresco Certified Engineer Exam

Back in March I blogged about why I took the Alfresco Certified Administrator exam (post). Today I passed the Alfresco Certified Engineer exam. I took it for the same reasons I took the ACA exam, as outlined in that post, so in this post, I thought I’d share how I studied for the test.

Let me start off with a complaint: There is nowhere I could find that describes which specific version of Alfresco the test covers. This wasn’t that big of a deal for the ACA exam, but for the ACE exam, I felt a little apprehensive not knowing.

I know Alfresco probably doesn’t want to lock the exam version to an Alfresco version. But the blueprint really needs to give people some idea. Ultimately, I decided 4.1 was a safe bet.

I can’t tell you what was on the test, but I can tell you how I studied.

First, review the blueprint

The exam blueprint is the only place that gives you hints as to what’s on the test. If you look at the blueprint, you’ll see that the test is divided into five areas: Architectural Core, Repository Customization, Web Scripting, UI Customization, and Alfresco API.

The blueprint breaks down each of those five areas into topics, but they are still pretty broad. Some of them helped me figure out what to review and some of them didn’t. For example, under Architectural Core, topics like “Repository”, “Subsystems”, and “Database” were too vague to be that helpful in guiding my study plans.

Next, identify your focus areas

Looking at the blueprint, most of those topics have been in the product since the early days and haven’t changed much. I figured I could take the test cold and pass those. But Share Configuration and Customization has changed here and there between releases. With a lot of different ways to do things, and ample opportunity for testing around minutiae, I figured this would be where I’d need to spend most of my study time. I also wanted to spend time reviewing the various API’s listed under Architectural Core because I typically just look those up rather than commit the details to memory.

To validate where I thought my focus areas should be I took the sample test on the blueprint page, which was helpful.

Now, study

For Architectural Core, I spent most of my time reviewing the list of public services in the Foundation API found in Appendix A of the Alfresco Developer Guide, the JavaScript API (also in Appendix A as well as the official documentation), and the Freemarker Templating API documentation.

For the Repository Customization I figured I had most of that down cold and just spent a little time reviewing Activiti BPM XML and associated workflow content models. The workflow tutorial on this site is one place with sample workflows to review and obviously the out-of-the-box workflows are also good examples.

According to the blueprint, the UI Customization section is now focused entirely on Alfresco Share, so I didn’t spend any time reviewing Alfresco Explorer customization. Instead, I read through the Share Configuration and Share Customization sections of the documentation. There are now tutorials on Share Customization in the Alfresco docs so I went through those again just to make sure everything was fresh. The Share configuration examples in my custom content types tutorial are another resource.

The Alfresco API section consists of questions about the Alfresco REST API and CMIS. This is only 5% of the test so I spent no time reviewing this. I also ignored Web Scripts, figuring my existing knowledge was good enough.

After studying the resources in my focus areas I took the sample test once more. It’s always the same set of questions, so taking it repeatedly isn’t a great way to prove your readiness, but at least you know you won’t miss those questions if they show up on the real test.

Feel ready? Go for it

If you get paid to work with Alfresco, you really ought to take this exam (and the ACA exam). Obviously, what I’ve reviewed here is a study plan for someone who has significant experience with the platform doing real world projects. If you are new to Alfresco you’ll have to adjust your plan and preparation time accordingly. Better yet, get a few projects under your belt first. I think it would be tough for someone with no practical experience to pass the test with any amount of study time, which is the whole point.

So there you go, that’s how I studied. Your mileage will vary based on what your focus areas need to be. Now go hit the books!

New tutorial on Share customization with Alfresco Aikau

Alfresco community member, Ole Hejlskov (ohej on IRC), has just published a wonderful tutorial on customizing Alfresco Share with the new Alfresco Aikau framework.

You may have seen one of Dave Draper’s recent blog posts introducing the new framework. Ole’s tutorial is the next step you should take in order to understand the framework and how it can be used to make tweaks or additions to Alfresco Share.

I was happy to see Ole follow my example for the format and publication of his tutorial and that he’s made both the tutorial itself and the source code available on GitHub for anyone that wants to make improvements.

Thanks for the hard work and the great tutorial, Ole!

Five steps you can use to figure out how anything in Alfresco Share really works

A forums user recently asked how to use the “quick share” feature from their own code. The implementation is easy to figure out, but I thought illustrating the steps you should use to dig into it would be instructive, because it is the same general pattern you would follow to learn how anything works in Alfresco.

What is Quick Share?

Quick Share makes it easy for end-users to share any document with anyone whether or not that person is a member of a site or has specific permissions on a document. Clicking the “Share” link in the document library or document details displays a dialog with a shortcut URL that will allow anyone to see a preview of the document. If that person also has access to the document, they can optionally download the document as well.

The Quick Share feature in Alfresco Share

 

How does this work behind-the-scenes? Let me show you how to figure that out. These steps can be used to demystify any Share-based functionality you need to learn more about.

Step 1: Determine the call Share makes to the repository

Share is just a front-end web application. It always talks to the repository via HTTP. Step 1 is to take advantage of that. Use Firebug or a similar browser-based client-side debugging tool to watch the network traffic between Share and the repository. If you turn that on you’ll see that when you click “Share” the browser makes a POST to:

http://localhost:8080/share/proxy/alfresco/api/internal/shared/share/workspace/SpacesStore/f70e2505-5002-42b7-a71b-2e09aca0c2d0

What comes back is JSON representing the quick share ID:

{
"sharedId": "oD9wUfV_SPS9eG-CFEpwbQ"
}

The first part of that URL, “/share/proxy/” is the Share proxy. It simply forwards the request on to the repository tier. In this case that’s a web script residing at “/alfresco/api/internal/shared/share”. The rest of the URL is the node reference of the node being shared.

As a side-note, unsharing works similarly. Share sends a DELETE to http://localhost:8080/share/proxy/alfresco/api/internal/shared/unshare/oD9wUfV_SPS9eG-CFEpwbQ

That returns JSON with the return flag:

{
"success" : true
}

So now you know how Share interacts with the repository. The next step is to dig into the repository tier implementation.

Step 2: Look at the repository web script

Now that you know the repository web script URL you can go to the web script console, http://localhost:8080/alfresco/s/index, to learn more about the web script. I find searching by URI to be easiest. Here’s the web script in the list:

web-script-index

Clicking on that link shows high-level information about the web script. Make note of this web script’s lifecycle–it is set to “internal”. That means you shouldn’t call it from your own applications or customizations. If you do, you may be creating a future maintenance headache because the web script may change without warning.

In this case, we don’t want to call the web script, we want to know what the web script is doing. Clicking on the web script ID will tell you more about how it is implemented. Here’s the URL where you’ll end up:

http://localhost:8080/alfresco/s/script/org/alfresco/repository/quickshare/share.post

This page is really helpful because it shows you the details about the web script implementation, including its views and controllers.

Web Script Implementation Details

In this case, the web script uses a Java controller implemented in the following class:
org.alfresco.repo.web.scripts.quickshare.ShareContentPost

The next step is to dig into the web script implementation.

Step 3: Read the source code for the implementation

If you search through your Alfresco source code you’ll find ShareContentPost.java. It’s a very simple web script. Here’s the line that does the work:

QuickShareDTO dto = quickShareService.shareContent(nodeRef);

Cool, so there is a QuickShareService. I’m going to make a time-saving leap here which is to assume that anything named like FooService is likely defined as a Spring bean that I can inject in my own code.

Step 4: Find the QuickShareService bean

If you’re going to write some Java code that leverages the QuickShareService you’ll probably want to see the Spring bean configuration for that bean. To find that, go into $TOMCAT_HOME/webapps/alfresco/WEB-INF/classes/alfresco and do a grep for QuickShareService. You’ll see that it is defined in quickshare-services-context.xml.

Now you have a Spring bean ID you can use as a dependency in your code.

Step 5: Understand the content model

You might choose to do this in an earlier step, but if you haven’t already, you should use the node browser in Share to see what happens to a node when it is shared just in case you need to make use of any of that information. By doing that you’ll see that a shared node has an aspect called qshare:shared. When it gets shared, the qshare:sharedId and qshare:sharedBy properties get set. In this example, the QuickShareService handles that for you–you shouldn’t have to set those manually. But it is good to know those properties are there in case you need them.

If you needed to learn more about the content model you could grep for that aspect ID, qshare:shared, in $TOMCAT_HOME/webapps/alfresco/WEB-INF/classes/alfresco/model to figure out where the model XML is.

Now you have everything you need to make use of this functionality in your own code. For example, if you wanted to create a rule action that automatically shared everything matching a certain criteria, you could easily do that by injecting the QuickShareService into your action and then calling the shareContent() method (see my actions tutorial).

This example covered the Alfresco Quick Share feature in the Alfresco Share web client, but you can use these steps to dig into any functionality in Alfresco Share that you need to deconstruct.

Cool things you can do in Alfresco with cmis:item support

allyoursysbaseI’ve been taking a look at the newly-added support for cmis:item in Alfresco. As a refresher for those who may not be familiar, cmis:item is a new object type added to the CMIS 1.1 specification. Alfresco added support for CMIS 1.1 in 4.2 but did not immediately add support for cmis:item, which is optional, according to the spec. Now cmis:item support is available in Alfresco in the cloud as well as the nightly builds of 4.3.a Community Edition.

So what is cmis:item?

We’ve all written content-centric applications that have included objects that don’t have a content stream. You might use one to store some configuration information, for example, or maybe you have some other object that doesn’t naturally include a file that needs to be managed as part of it. There are a few approaches to this in Alfresco:

  1. Create your custom type as a child of sys:base (or cm:cmobject if you don’t mind your objects being subject to the file name constraint)
  2. Create your custom type as child of cm:content and simply do not set a content stream
  3. Ignore the content model altogether and use the attribute service

I’m not going to cover the third option in this post. If you want to learn more about the attribute service you should take a look at the Tech Talk Live we did in April.

The second option is fine, but then you’ve got objects with content properties that will never be set. Your objects look like they want to be documents, but they really aren’t because you don’t expect them to ever have a file as part of the object. Not the end of the world, but it’s kind of lazy and potentially confusing to developers that come after you.

The first option is what most people go with, but it has a drawback. Instances of types that do not extend from cm:content or cm:folder are invisible to CMIS 1.0. Not only are those objects invisible to CMIS 1.0 but relationships that point to such objects are also invisible. Depending on how much you use CMIS in your application this could be a fairly severe limitation.

Thankfully, CMIS 1.1 addresses the issue with a new object type called cmis:item. It’s made precisely for this purpose.

What can I do with it out-of-the-box?

Even if your custom content model doesn’t need a “content-less object” you can still benefit from cmis:item support. Let me walk you through my five favorite object types that you can now work with via cmis:item support in CMIS 1.1 that were not previously available: Category, Person, Group, Rating, and Rule. I tested everything I’m showing you here using Alfresco 4.3.a Community Edition, Nightly Build (4/27/2014, (r68092-b4954) schema 7003) and Apache Chemistry OpenCMIS Workbench 0.11.0.

Category

Man, if I had a bitcoin for every person I’ve seen asking how to get the categories of a document via CMIS, I’d have a garage full of Teslas. With cmis:item support, it’s easy. Here’s how you get a list of every category in the system with a CMIS Query Language (CQL) query:

SELECT * FROM cm:category

That returns a list of cm:category objects that represent each category in the system. Note that this is a flat list. In Alfresco, categories are hierarchical. I’m not sure what the plan to address that is, to be honest.

Now suppose you have an object and you want to know the categories that have been assigned. Here is some Groovy code that does that:

(Can’t see the code? Click here)

Categories live in a property called “cm:categories”. It’s a multi-value field that contains the Alfresco node references for each category that has been assigned to a document. Once you get that list you can iterate over them and fetch the cm:category object to figure out the category’s human-readable name. That’s pretty cool and wasn’t possible before CMIS 1.1 support.

How about assigning existing categories to documents? Sure, no problem. Here’s how.

(Can’t see the code? Click here)

This is a little Groovy function that takes a full path to a document and the name of a category. Obviously it depends on your categories being uniquely-named.

First, it finds the category by name using CQL and snags its Alfresco node reference.

Next, it checks to see if the cm:generalclassifiable aspect has already been added to the document and adds it if it has not.

Finally, it gets the current list of categories from the cm:categories property and adds the new category’s node reference to it.

I started to look at creating new categories with CMIS, but it isn’t immediately obvious how that would work due to the hierarchical nature of categories. The only parent-child association supported by CMIS is the one implied by folder-document relationship. I’ll ask around and see if there’s a trick.

That’s it for categories. Let’s look at Person objects next.

Person

Here’s another frequently-asked how-to: How do I query users through CMIS? Before cmis:item support you couldn’t do it, but now you can. For example, here is how you can use CQL to find a list of the Person objects in Alfresco:

SELECT * FROM cm:person

You can qualify it further based on properties of cm:person. For example, maybe I want all users who’s first name starts with “Te” and who work for an organization that starts with “Green”. That query looks like:

SELECT * FROM cm:person where cm:firstName like 'Te%' and cm:organization like 'Green%'

Suppose you wanted to find every Alfresco Person object that has a city starting with “Dallas” and you want to set their postal code to “75070”. Ignoring cities named “Dallas” that aren’t in Texas (like Dallas, Georgia) or the fact that there are multiple zip codes in Dallas, Texas, the code would look like this:

(Can’t see the code? Click here)

That’s it for Person objects. Let’s look at Group objects.

Group

Similar to querying for Person objects, cmis:item support gives you the ability to query for groups–all you have to know is that groups are implemented as instances of cm:authorityContainer. Here’s the query:

SELECT * FROM cm:authorityContainer

Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem possible to use CMIS to actually add or remove members to or from the group. Maybe that will change at some point.

Rating

It’s easy to query for ratings:

SELECT * FROM cm:rating

But it’s hard to do anything useful with those objects because, at least in this nightly release, you can’t follow the relationships from or two a rating. As a sidenote, you can get the count and total for a specific node’s ratings by getting the value of the cm:likesRatingSchemeCount and cm:likesRatingSchemeTotal properties respectively. But that’s not related to cmis:item support.

Rule

Rules are a powerful feature in Alfresco that help you automate document handling. Here’s how to use a query to get a list of rules in your repository:

SELECT * FROM rule:rule

Rules are so handy you might end up with a bunch of them. What if you wanted to find all of the rules that matched a certain criteria (title, for example) so that you could enable them and tell them to run on sub-folders? Here is a little Groovy that does that:

(Can’t see the code? Click here)

First the code uses a join to find the rule based on a title. The property that holds a rule’s title is defined in an aspect and that requires a join when writing CQL.

Then the code simply iterates over the result set and updates the rule:applyToChildren and rule:disabled properties. You could also set the rule’s type, description, and whether or not it runs asynchronously. It does not appear to be possible to change the actions or the filter criteria for a rule through CMIS at this time.

What about custom types?

Custom types? Sure, no problem. Suppose I have a type called sc:client that extends sys:base and has two properties, sc:clientName and sc:clientId. Alfresco automatically makes that type accessible via CMIS. It’s easy to create a new instance and set the value of those two properties. Here’s the groovy code to do it:

(Can’t see the code? Click here)

Did you notice I created the object in a folder? In Alfresco, everything lives in a folder, even things that aren’t documents. In CMIS parlance, you would say that Alfresco does not support “unfiled” objects.

The custom object can be queried as you would expect, including where clauses that use the custom property values, like this:

SELECT * FROM sc:client where sc:clientId = '56789'

In CMIS 1.0 you could not use CMIS to work with associations (“relationships”) between objects that did not inherit from either cm:content (cmis:document) or cm:folder (cmis:folder). In CMIS 1.1 that changed. You can create relationships between documents and folders and items. Unfortunately, in the latest nightly build this does not appear to be implemented. Hopefully that goes in soon!

Summary

The new cmis:item type in CMIS 1.1 is a nice addition to the specification that is useful when you are working with objects that are not documents and do not have a content stream. I showed you some out-of-the-box types you can work with via cmis:item but you can also leverage cmis:item with your custom types as well.

Support for cmis:item requires CMIS 1.1 and either Alfresco in the cloud or a recent nightly build of Alfresco 4.3.

Updated tutorial: Implementing Custom Behaviors in Alfresco

I have published a major revision to my Implementing Custom Behaviors in Alfresco tutorial. I hadn’t really touched it since 2007–behaviors, the ability to bind programming logic to types, aspects, and events in Alfresco, haven’t changed at all since then.

The changes are mainly around using the Alfresco Maven SDK to produce AMPs and the addition of unit tests to the project. I also gave it a bit of a style scrub to make it more consistent with other tutorials.

The tutorial continues with the SomeCo example. In this tutorial you will create the content model and behavior needed to implement the back-end for SomeCo’s five star rating functionality. By the end of this tutorial you will know:

  • What a behavior is
  • How to bind a behavior to specific policies such as onCreateNode and onDeleteNode
  • How to write behaviors in Java as well as server-side JavaScript
  • How to write a unit test that tests your behavior

This tutorial, the source code that accompanies it, and the rest of the tutorials in the Alfresco Developer Series reside on GitHub. If you want to help with improvements, fork the project and send me a pull request.

Next week I hope to publish a major revision of the Introduction to Web Scripts tutorial.

Updated tutorial: Creating Custom Actions in Alfresco

I have published an updated version of the Creating Custom Actions in Alfresco tutorial. Similar to the recently updated Working With Custom Content Types in Alfresco tutorial, this version has been updated to match the refactored code which now assumes you are using the Alfresco Maven SDK to produce AMPs and that you are using Alfresco Share as the user interface. I’ve removed all references to Alfresco Explorer.

The Custom Actions tutorial covers:

  • What is an action
  • How to write your own custom action in Java
  • How to invoke the custom action from a rule or from the Alfresco Share UI
  • Configuring an evaluator to hide the UI action when certain conditions are true
  • Configuring an indicator to show an icon in the document library when documents meet certain conditions
  • Writing and executing unit tests with the Alfresco Maven SDK

If you aren’t familiar with the Alfresco Maven SDK and you need help diving in, take a look at this tutorial.

All of the tutorial source code and text for the Alfresco Developer Series of tutorials is on GitHub. Please fork the project, make improvements, and send me pull requests.

Next on the to-be-updated list is the Custom Behaviors tutorial. I expect that to go live sometime next week.

Updated tutorial: Working with Custom Content Types in Alfresco

The Working with Custom Content Types tutorial has just been given a major revision. I’ve updated it to match the refactored code. Here is a summary of the high-level changes:

  • Instructions now assume you are using the Alfresco Maven SDK. If you haven’t played with the Alfresco Maven SDK yet, check out my recently published tutorial on the subject.
  • Removed all mention of Alfresco Explorer. The tutorial is now exclusively focused on Alfresco Share for the user interface part.
  • Removed all mention of the Alfresco Web Services API. The tutorial is now exclusively focused on CMIS as the preferred API for performing CRUD functions against the Alfresco repository.

The code and the tutorial text reside in GitHub. If you find issues or make improvements, please fork the repository and send me a pull request.

New Tutorial: Getting Started with the Alfresco Maven SDK

I’ve written a new tutorial about Getting Started with the Alfresco Maven SDK. I hope it helps newcomers to Alfresco get started writing customizations quickly. And if you are an experienced Alfresco developer who still uses Ant-based builds, I hope it motivates you to make the switch to Apache Maven.

The Alfresco Maven SDK is the preferred way to bootstrap, manage, and build your Alfresco modules. The cool thing is that you don’t need anything to get started–if you already have a JDK and Apache Maven installed, you are ready to write custom Alfresco modules for the Alfresco repository and Alfresco Share, whether you are using Community Edition or Enterprise Edition.

The tutorial itself is an HTML page on this site, but I wrote it using Markdown. It lives in a GitHub repository, along with my older tutorials on custom content types, actions, behaviors, web scripts, and advanced workflows. Those tutorials have also recently been converted to Markdown and the accompanying source code has been refactored to use the Alfresco Maven SDK and AMPs, but I am still busy revising the tutorial text to match the refactored code.

I hope that by writing these tutorials in Markdown and storing them in GitHub the Alfresco community will be more likely to help me maintain them over time by forking the repository and sending me pull requests.

Happy 5th Birthday, Alfresco Developer Guide!

Birthday Cake by Will ClaytonIt is hard to believe that the Alfresco Developer Guide was published five years ago this month (really, the tail end of October). My goal at the time was to help flatten the learning curve around the Alfresco platform and encourage people still using legacy ECM systems to make the leap. Based on the number of people who come up to me at meetups, conferences, and other events to tell me how much the book helped their projects, their teams, and even their careers, I’d say that goal was met and that makes me very happy.

The product and the company have definitely evolved a lot since 2008. The chapter on WCM is no longer relevant. The section on Single Sign-On is out-of-date. The book was written before Alfresco Share existed. And, at the time, jBPM was the only workflow engine in the product and Solr was not yet on the scene, nor was mobile. Both JCR and the native Web Services APIs have given way to CMIS as the preferred API. And Maven and AMPs are the recommended way to manage dependencies, run builds, and package extensions.

But the fundamentals of content modeling haven’t changed. Rules, actions, and behaviors are still great ways to automate content processing. Web Scripts are vital to any developer’s understanding of Alfresco, including those doing Share customizations. And, though the preferred workflow engine is Activiti rather than jBPM, the basics of how to design and deploy content-centric business processes in Alfresco haven’t changed that much.

So where do we go from here? The book was originally based on a set of tutorials I published here on ecmarchitect. Last year I created second editions of many of the tutorials to catch them up with major advancements in the platform. For example, the custom content types tutorial now includes Share configuration and CMIS. The custom actions tutorial now includes how to write Share UI actions. And the workflow tutorial now assumes Activiti and Alfresco Share rather than jBPM and Alfresco Explorer.

The source code that accompanied the book lives in Google Code, but I recently moved the source code that accompanies the tutorials to GitHub. I’m busy refactoring the tutorial source code to use Maven and AMPs. I’ve also started moving the actual tutorial text to markdown and am checking it in to GitHub so that the community can help me revise it and keep it up-to-date.

I learned a lot writing that first book. One of the lessons is to always work with co-authors. That made a big difference on CMIS and Apache Chemistry in Action. I hope that book helps as many people as the Alfresco Developer Guide did and I look forward to reflecting back on how CMIS has changed on that book’s fifth birthday in 2018.