Yet another reason to love Open Source Content Management

Man, I don’t miss delivering solutions on top of Documentum. After reading Laurence Hart’s post on Documentum Developer Edition, I’m reminded how much I take for granted working exclusively in the open source content management world.

Laurence’s post was intended to discuss the ins and outs of Documentum’s efforts to make it easier for developers, and, as usual, he’s done a good job of that. But it also underscores the benefits enjoyed by those who work in open source land. In case you don’t know how good you’ve got it, my open source brothers and sisters, check it out:

Developers working with closed source ECM vendors have to pay to get the software

As Laurence points out,

“There are lots of independent consultants out there that have trouble keeping-up with the technology because they can’t afford to become partners for the requisite fee.”

If you are a developer looking to go deep on closed source software, you have no choice but to pay. There’s no other way to get access to the software. Sometimes you can’t even get access to the documentation or the bug database without a paid-up partner account (or a client that lets you use theirs).

[UPDATE: Jerry Silver, from EMC, points out that the Documentum Developer Edition is a free download. My original post made it sound like you had to be part of the partner program to obtain the download.]

With open source, the barrier to entry is much lower. You pay nothing to get the software. It’s all about the time and energy you put into learning the product and implementing cool solutions.

To be fair, commercial open source vendors often charge partner fees as well, but the bottom line is that it costs nothing to get started with the code.

Developers working with closed source ECM vendors struggle with giant developer footprints

I feel sorry for Laurence’s laptop:

“The complete Development install calls for 3GB of RAM (after a 1.7+GB download).  That is no small thing for a development laptop.  It needs to be on a newer machine.  If you can move the database service to a different box, that will make your life easier.”

Oh dear. A 1.7GB download for a developer setup? Am I downloading a VM image or a content management server? Let’s look at Alfresco for a comparison. Assuming you are starting from scratch, and assuming you are going to go full-on with the Alfresco platform, your total download is right around 300MB. That includes:

  • Alfresco SDK
  • Alfresco WAR
  • Alfresco WCM (Deployment listener and add-on to core repo)
  • Apache Tomcat
  • Sun JDK
  • MySQL (Server and connector)

All of which runs comfortably in 2GB of RAM and won’t even cause your fan to kick on in 4GB.

Developers working with closed source ECM vendors have less choice

Optaros consultants are now split fairly evenly in their choice of OS across Windows, Mac OS X, and some flavor of Linux. Some people prefer MySQL and some prefer PostgreSQL. Mostly we use Eclipse for Java development but everyone’s got a preference. I use Tomcat for everything locally while others like JBoss. The point is, developers want to use their tools the way they want to. It’s not a stubbornness thing it’s an efficiency thing.

Within my CMS I want the same flexibility. I want to tweak settings. I want to name my database what I want. I want the flexibility to deploy across as many (or as few) nodes as I need to. From Laurence’s post, it sounds like Documentum clearly falls down here.

Developers working with closed source ECM vendors can’t see the code

It’s obvious, I know. For developers that work with open source it is extremely natural to use the CMS source code when debugging or for reference. You don’t even think about it–it’s just there and you use it. Imagine the frustration of someone who works with closed source CMS who has to routinely decompile classes to figure out what’s going on. That truly sucks. What good is a “Developer Edition” that doesn’t come with source code?

Partner defections from closed source are on the rise

I’ve seen recent announcements from multiple partners who were previously exclusive to closed source vendors but are now adding open source to their partner list. This is a reflection of increasing demand by customers who are realizing the business value of open source, especially in tough economic times as well as partners’ desire to make up for sagging demand in the proprietary world. But could it also be that more firms are realizing how much more productive and pleasant it is to work with open source content management?

Help your employer/client see the light

Open source ECM technologies like Alfresco, Drupal, Liferay, Lucene, and many others, are now at or beyond their closed source equivalents. If you are a developer who’s sick of the shackles closed source CMS places on you, why not suggest exploring open source alternatives?

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