Category: Alfresco

Alfresco open source content management

A simple one-way calendar integration for Alfresco Share

Photo credit: Dafne Cholet
Photo credit: Dafne Cholet

A common request is to integrate the Alfresco Share calendar with an external calendaring system such as Outlook, Google Calendar, or Zimbra. Without an integration, people end up doing double-entry. You’ve already got a calendar that works pretty well. Why make people re-enter events in Alfresco Share?

Most people use Alfresco Share for team collaboration. The calendar doesn’t need to show everything on everyone’s calendar–that job is better left to the existing calendar server. What makes more sense is to show a few team-related events or milestones on the team’s Alfresco Share site calendar or maybe in a dashlet on the site’s dashboard.

When thinking about the problem, I realized that the calendar in Share is just another interested party in an event. Just as some calendaring systems allow you to “invite” a conference room to a meeting which effectively reserves that room for the meeting, you ought to be able to “invite” a Share site and have the Share site add that event to its calendar and update it when the event changes.

Treating the Share site as just another invitee is a non-invasive way to integrate with the calendaring system and it has the added benefit that only events in which the Share site was specifically invited will show up on the Share site calendar.

As luck would have it, the pieces to make this work already exist and they don’t require any changes to the source calendaring system. Check it out:

  • When you invite someone to a calendar event the calendaring system sends an iCalendar (.ICS) file as an email attachment to the invitee. The invitee’s email or calendaring client recognizes that attachment and updates the calendar accordingly.
  • There’s a Java library called iCal4j that knows how to parse iCalendar files. Yea for standards!
  • Alfresco supports receiving inbound email and you can easily bind custom logic to the creation of nodes. Alfresco creates one document for the email body and one for the ICS file attachment.
  • Events that show up on the Alfresco Share calendar are just content-less objects–they are instances of ia:calendarEvent.

Put those pieces together and a simple one-way calendar integration is born. The integration watches for incoming email with ICS attachments, parses the attachment, then creates, updates, or deletes the corresponding Alfresco Share site calendar object.

With this in place, all you have to do to add an event to the Alfresco Share site calendar is invite the Share site to the event from your favorite calendaring system.

But what’s the invitee name of a Share site? Great question! In Alfresco, there’s an aspect called email alias. You can add it to any folder and give it an arbitrary value. Then, when sending email to Alfresco you can specify the alias.

My integration includes code that makes sure all Share sites have a folder that can be used to store inbound email and it gives that folder an alias equal to the Share site’s short name (which is used as part of the Share URL). So if your Share site is called “test-site-1” and you normally send email to Alfresco via alfresco.someco.com, your Share site’s email address becomes test-site-1@alfresco.someco.com.

What about updates? Calendar systems have a universal identifier for every event. When calendar entries are updated or deleted, the calendaring system sends an iCalendar file just as it does for new events. Included in that file is the event’s unique ID and a flag that indicates whether the event is being created or deleted. When the integration creates the event in the Alfresco Share calendar, it stores the unique ID in the Alfresco object’s metadata which it can use later to match up subsequent update and delete requests.

How about a demo?

This video shows the integration in action. Be sure to make it full screen and select “HD”.

(If you can’t see the video, watch it on YouTube here).

What’s left to do?

This is a simple, one-way integration. It does not tell the corporate calendaring system which sites are available and it does not do a free-busy lookup. It also does not acknowledge the invitation back to the source calendaring system. I don’t consider these to be critical gaps but those features might make the integration tighter.

As a side-note, the automatic creation of an email alias for a Share site and a corresponding folder to hold inbound email (which users could then configure rules for) might be useful as a separate add-on even if you don’t need calendar integration. If you agree, let me know. Maybe the integration ought to be split into two separate AMPs.

Pull requests welcome

As usual, I welcome your participation on this project. If you find problems, fix problems, or want to make improvements, use the github project to create issues and pull requests.

Register now for BeeCon, the Alfresco Community Conference

Order of the BeeRegistration for BeeCon 2016 is now open. What the heck is BeeCon? BeeCon is the first-ever, independently-organized conference focused entirely on Alfresco. The BeeCon web site says it best:

Alfresco professionals and enthusiasts come to BeeCon to sharpen their technical skills and collaborate with other experts…Whether you are a developer, information professional, student, or Alfresco employee, BeeCon is the place to dive deep into Alfresco and develop the relationships which you will need to be successful in the coming year.

The conference is organized by the Order of the Bee, an independent community focused on Alfresco.

Who Will Attend?

BeeCon is an event organized by and targeted towards the Alfresco community. It is built around the idea that what makes our community great is its open, collaborative spirit. And that, from time-to-time, it is important to meet face-to-face to learn from each other, hash out ideas, strengthen personal relationships, and just have fun.

If Alfresco is just a piece of software to you, then this is a conference with a lot of technical how-to’s that will help you get your project done, and you should come for that reason. When you arrive, though, you’re going to find out that a lot of people have crossed oceans and continents to be in Brussels because not only is the software important, but because, as a community, we have a lot of work to do. And the people who care about the Alfresco community are using this event to get organized and to map the way forward.

If you love sales pitches and marketing fluff you should sit this one out. But if you…

  • want to learn more about the technical details from experts;
  • are already running Alfresco in your organization, whether that’s Enterprise or Community Edition; or
  • want to help shape the future of the community and the platform

…then you need to attend BeeCon 2016.

More than a Meetup

This is more than a meetup. It’s a real two-day conference with keynotes, tracks, and a hack-a-thon. The goal is to make it similar to past events like DevCon with really great content and outstanding people, but without the big budget (or price tag).

You can register now for about 60 Euros. If you wait the price goes up to about 90 Euros.

Support from Alfresco and Other Sponsors

The BeeCon team has focused on keeping things practical and inexpensive. But events like this simply cannot succeed without help from sponsors. This year, CIRB-CIBG is providing the venue, A/V equipment, and WiFi, which is amazing because those three items are the biggest in terms of cost for any event. What’s even more amazing is that we enjoy additional support from a number of sponsors including Alfresco, Contezza, ITD Systems, keensoft, VDEL, and Xenit. You should thank these folks when you see them.

Stay Tuned for the Detailed Agenda

The program team received a number of speaking submissions from Alfresco engineers and community members from all over the world. They are busy reviewing those and will get the conference web site updated as things solidify. The team is picky–they want sessions to be high quality and packed with information you can use on your Alfresco projects right away. I’m looking forward to seeing the finished agenda, but I’m not going to wait to register.

Space is Limited, Do Not Wait to Register!

While you’re thinking about it, complete your registration. It’s only 60 Euros. I’ll bet you can slip that into an expense report without much fuss. And when you bring the things you learn back to the office, you’ll win respect and adoration from your boss and coworkers. Not bad for 60 Euros.

When making your travel plans for Brussels, remember that we’ll be getting together Wednesday night, April 27, for a welcome reception. The conference runs two days, April 28-29. Then, whomever is interested can come with us to the medieval city of Bruges on Saturday, April 30, for a day of sightseeing. I’ve been to Bruges–it’s gorgeous. You won’t want to miss it. Plus, it will be nice to hang out with your favorite community members, Belgian-style.

I look forward to seeing you in Brussels in April!

Back to the Future of Content Repositories

mcflyFive years ago I wrote a blog post called, “Alfresco, NoSQL, and the Future of ECM“. Today is “Back to the Future Day”–the exact date Marty McFly time-traveled to in the movie Back to the Future. The movie made many observations about what life would be like on October 21, 2015–some were spot on, some not so much. I thought it fitting that we take a look at my old blog post and see where we are now with regard to content repositories and NoSQL.

One point of the post was that NOSQL might be a more fitting back-end for content repositories than relational:

But why shouldn’t the Content Management tier benefit from the scalability and replication capabilities of a NOSQL repository? And why can’t a NOSQL repository have an end-user focused user interface with integrated workflow, a form service, and other traditional DM/CMS/WCM functionality? It should, it can and they will.

This has definitely turned out to be the case. New content management solution vendors like CloudCMS have built their platform on NOSQL technology while older vendors, such as Nuxeo, have started to integrate NOSQL into their solutions.

Open source projects are also taking advantage of the technology. Apache Jackrabbit provides an implementation of the JCR standard. Its “next generation” offering, Jackrabbit Oak, is essentially JCR with MongoDB as the back-end.The second point of the post was that as NOSQL repositories become more widely adopted, they compete directly with content repositories in use cases where those content repositories are used primarily as a back-end for developers’ custom content-centric solutions.

In other words, 5 or 10 years ago, if you were a developer looking to implement a custom application, and you wanted something other than a relational back-end, you might build your application on top of something like Alfresco. Now developers may be less likely to go that route. That’s because today there is an explosion of stacks out there. Many of them assume a NOSQL back-end. Look at mean.io as just one example, which combines Node.js, Express (the Node.js web framework), AngularJS, and MongoDB and wraps it up with time-saving tooling.

Many people use Alfresco as a back-end. Their front-end uses a RESTful API implemented as web scripts to talk to the repository. The value the repository brings to the table is the ability to store documents in a hierarchy along with custom metadata defined in a content model. They may not be using Alfresco Share or much of the other functionality that Alfresco bundles with their offering–for their custom solution Alfresco is just a repository. When it is used like this, Alfresco is doing nothing more than what NOSQL repositories offer, and, in fact, it does less because NOSQL repositories have a more flexible schema and are built to be clustered and massively distributable–for free.

Years ago, Alfresco shifted its focus away from developers looking to build custom solutions on top of a bare repository. Its developer outreach is now more about customizing Alfresco Share and the underlying repository. Nuxeo, on the other hand, has doubled-down on its developer focus. I’ll spend some more time on this in a future post.

I guess this trend wasn’t terribly hard to predict five years ago, but it does feel kinda nice to see it come to pass. Now, if I could just have a hoverboard.

Alfresco cancels Summit, asks community to organize its own conference

summit-community-editionEarlier this week, in a post to a public mailing list, Ole Hejlskov, Developer Evangelist at Alfresco, announced that the company will not be putting on its annual conference, Alfresco Summit, this year as originally planned. Instead, the company is focusing on smaller, shorter, sales-oriented events which have been very successful in several cities around the globe.

Ole said that Alfresco will be adding developer content to its Alfresco Day events, which have historically been mostly end-user and decision-maker focused. In contrast, Alfresco’s yearly events started out as developer-focused conferences, but in recent years had a more balanced agenda with both technical and non-technical tracks.

Alfresco had announced earlier in the year that their annual conference would be in New Orleans in November. In each of the last five years the company put on two conferences–one in Europe and the other in United States. For 2015 the plan was to have a single conference only in the U.S. which drew criticism from the community that skews heavily toward a non-U.S. demographic.

When the community realized Alfresco Summit 2015 would be held only in the U.S., an independent community organization called The Order of the Bee began making plans to hold their own conference in Europe. Alfresco says it will support the community’s efforts to hold its own event and wants to explore “…ways in which participation from Alfresco corporate makes sense”.

I understand where Alfresco is coming from. Annual conferences are expensive in both real dollars and the time and attention it takes to plan and execute. When you multiply that times two it obviously represents an even bigger investment.

You also have to look at what Alfresco gets out of the conference. Alfresco is increasingly sales-focused. The conference has historically been focused on knowledge-sharing and camaraderie. Yes, there were deals closed at Alfresco Summit but it was not geared towards selling. It was more about coming together to share stories, good and bad.

The Alfresco Day events are unabashedly sales and marketing. The attendees (and they get very large turnouts) know this which means Alfresco does not have to apologize for coming off too sales-y. Multiple cities with hundreds of prospects is a better investment for them than two cities with 1400 attendees who are existing customers and community members.

As the guy who led DevCon and Alfresco Summit and together with my team grew it year after year, it is weird to see Alfresco cancel the conference for 2015. I was looking forward to attending.

As a member of The Order of the Bee, I’m intrigued by the challenge of using an all-volunteer organization to potentially put together a replacement conference of some sort. If you have any interest in helping and you did not see my email to the mailing list, we’ll probably be meeting next week to get organized. Reach out to me and I’ll add you to the invitation.

The plain truth about Alfresco’s open source ethos

There was a small flare-up on the Order of the Bee list this week. It started when someone suggested that the Community Edition (CE) versus Enterprise Edition comparison page on alfresco.com put CE in a negative light. In full disclosure, I collaborated with Marketing on that page when I worked for Alfresco. My goal at the time was to make sure that the comparison was fair and that it didn’t disparage Community Edition. I think it still passes that test and is similar to the comparison pages of other commercial open source companies.

My response to the original post to the list was that people shouldn’t bother trying to get the page changed. Why? Because how Alfresco Software, Inc. chooses to market their software is out-of-scope for the community. As long as the commercial company behind Alfresco doesn’t say anything untrue about Community Edition, the community shouldn’t care.

The fact that there is a commercial company behind Alfresco, that they are in the business of selling Enterprise support subscriptions, and at the same time have a vested interest in promoting the use of Community Edition to certain market segments is something you have to get your head around.

Actually there are a handful of things that you really need to understand and accept so you can be a happy member of the community. Here they are:

1. CE is distributed under LGPLv3 so it is open source.

If you need to put a label on it and you are a binary type of person, this is at the top of the list. Alfresco is “open source” because it is distributed under an OSI-approved license. A more fine-grained description is that it is “open core” because the same software is distributed under two different licenses, with the enterprise version being based on the free version and including features not available in the free version.

2. Committers will only ever be employees.

There have been various efforts over the years to get the community more involved in making direct code contributions. The most recent is that Aikau is on github and accepting pull requests. Maybe some day the core repository will be donated to Apache or some other foundation. Until then, if you want to commit directly to core, send a resume to Alfresco Software, Inc. I know they are hiring talented engineers.

3. Alfresco Software, Inc. is a commercial, for-profit business.

Already mentioned, but worth repeating: The company behind the software earns revenue from support subscriptions, and, increasingly, value-added features not available in the open source distribution. The company is going to do everything it can to maximize revenue. The community needs this to be the case because a portion of those resources support the community product. The company needs the community, so it won’t do anything to aggressively undermine adoption of the free product. You have to believe this to be true. A certain amount of trust is required for a symbiotic relationship to work.

4. “Open source” is not a guiding principle for the company.

Individuals within the company are ardent open source advocates and passionate and valued community members, but the organization as a whole does not use “open source” as a fundamental guiding principle. This should not be surprising when you consider that:

  1. “Drive Open Innovation” not “Open Source” is a core value to the company as publicly expressed on the Our Values page.
  2. The leadership team has no open source experience (except John Newton and PHH whose open source experience is Alfresco and Activiti).
  3. The community team doesn’t exist any more–the company has shifted to a “developer engagement” strategy rather than having a dedicated community leadership or advocacy team.

Accept the fact that this is a software company like any other, that distributes some of its software under an open source license and employs many talented people who spend a lot of their time (on- and off-hours) to further the efforts of the community. It is not a “everything-we-do-we-do-because-open-source” kind of company. It just isn’t.

5. Alfresco originally released under an open source license primarily as a go-to-market strategy

In the early days, open source was attractive to the company not because it wanted help building the software, but because the license undermined the position of proprietary vendors and because they hoped to gain market share quickly by leveraging the viral nature of freely-distributable software. Being open was an attractive (and highly marketable) contrast to the extremely closed and proprietary nature of legacy ECM vendors such as EMC and Microsoft.

I think John and Paul also hoped that the open and transparent nature of open source would lend itself to developer adoption, third-party integrations and add-ons, and a partner ecosystem, which it did.

I think it is this last one–the mismatch between the original motivations to release as open source and what we as a community expect from an open source project–that causes angst. The “open source” moniker attracts people who wish the project was more like an organic open source project than it can or ever will be.

For me, personally, I accepted these as givens a long time ago–none of them bother me any more. I am taking this gift that we’ve been given–a highly-functional, freely-distributable ECM platform–and I’m using it to help people. I’m no longer interested in holding the company to a dogmatic standard they never intended to be held to.

So be cool and do your thing

The “commercial” part of “commercial open source” creates a tension that is felt both internally and externally. Internal tension happens when decisions have to be made for the benefit of one side at the expense of the other. External tension happens when the community feels like the company isn’t always acting in their best interest and lacks the context or visibility needed to believe otherwise.

This tension is a natural by-product of the commercial open source model. It will always be there. Let’s acknowledge it, but I see no reason to antagonize it.

If you want to help the community around Alfresco, participate. Build something. Install the software and help others get it up and running. Join the Order of the Bee. If you want to help Alfresco with its marketing, send them your resume.

Alfresco tutorials updated to SDK 2.0 and Alfresco 5.0

I’ve recently updated the Alfresco Developer Series tutorials to work with version 2.0 of the Alfresco SDK and Alfresco 5.0.d (and Enterprise 5.0).

Note that the SDK is not backwards compatible. If you are running Alfresco 4.x you need to use the older version of the SDK. When you move to 5.0 you need to move to SDK 2.0. The steps to do that are roughly:

1. Merge your pom.xml with the one generated by the 2.0 archetype.
2. Copy/merge tomcat/context.xml.
3. Copy run.sh from a 2.0 project into yours. Only needed if you are using spring-loaded.
4. Copy/merge src/test/resources.
5. Copy/merge src/test/properties.

That part was easy for all of the tutorial projects. The time-consuming part was just updating the screenshots and a few of the steps. The code stayed the same across all projects.

If you are still on 4.x and you want to use the tutorials that are specific to the older version, just use the source tagged with “4.x” on github.

Quick Hack: Restricting Create Site Links to a Site Creators Group

At Alfresco Summit 2014 there was a wonderful session from Angel Borroy called, “10 Enhancements That Require Less Than 10 Lines of Code“. If you missed it you should follow that link and watch the recording.

Angel said the talk was inspired by my blog post about an example add-on I created that allows you to define default folder structures that get populated in the document library when you create a new site (see share-site-space-templates on GitHub).

One of the other 9 enhancements Angel showed was how to hide the “Create Site” link. I’ve seen so many of my clients and people in the forums asking for this functionality, I decided to enhance it a little bit, put it in an AMP, and make it available on GitHub. You can download share-site-creators and try it out for yourself.

Here’s a little more about how it works…

Instead of hiding the “Create Site” link from everyone but administrators, my add-on allows you to create a group that is used to determine who can create sites. The group, appropriately enough, is called “Site Creators”. If you aren’t in that group, you won’t see the “Create Site” link in any of these places:

  • The Sites menu
  • The “My Sites” Dashlet
  • The “Welcome” dashlet

Additionally, the add-on changes the underlying permissions at the repository tier so that if your teammates are hackers, they cannot circumvent the user interface and create their sites using other means.

The screenshot below (click to enlarge) shows what it looks like when you aren’t a member of the Site Creators group:

The Share Site Creators add-on restricts the Create Site link to a specific groupYou might notice that the text of the “Sharing” column in the welcome dashlet also changes to be more applicable to someone who cannot create their own sites.

The new text is in a properties file. Currently I have only an English version, so if any of my multi-lingual friends want to translate the new string, that might be useful to others.

Just like my Share Site Space Templates add-on, this one is not mind-blowing. But it is useful, both in terms of functionality, and as an example of how to override Alfresco Share web scripts without copying-and-pasting tons of code.

I’ve tested this with Alfresco 4.2.f Community Edition. If you want to get it working with other versions, or you have other improvements, bring on the pull requests!

Richard Esplin steps down as Head of Alfresco Community Relations

Things continue to be in flux at Alfresco with regards to how they manage their community. Today, Richard Esplin announced that he is stepping down as Head of Alfresco Community Relations to become a Product Manager for Alfresco Community Edition. In his blog post, Richard says that although his title changed a while back, his day-to-day job has still been mostly focused on the community, until now.

It sounds like rather than having a centralized team focused on managing the community, the various community touch points will be diffused throughout the organization.

Last month, Alfresco hired long-time community member, author, and former Ixxus employee, Martin Bergljung. I know through the grapevine there are more community hires on the way. These seem to be focused on “developer outreach” and “developer ecosystem” which is one aspect of community management.

I hope the “community is everyone’s job” approach does not lead to a “community is no one’s job” problem at Alfresco.

Related to Community Edition, Richard said, “I will be rethinking our approach to Alfresco Community Edition in order to make it a better product for its target audience”. My worry here is that there hasn’t always been agreement on what is the “target audience” for Alfresco Community Edition. In the past, Alfresco Software, Inc. has wanted the target audience to be developers who experiment and test out code that will ultimately become Enterprise Edition. The reality has been that many people want to run Community Edition in production–they want a high quality, free/libre open source software product that helps them solve document management problems.

Hopefully, Richard and the rest of the Alfresco team are aligned to the new reality of how Community Edition is being used.

It will definitely be interesting to see how these staffing shifts work out for the community.

Book Review: Learning Alfresco Web Scripts

Packt Publishing recently sent me a copy of Learning Alfresco Web Scripts by Ramesh Chauhan to review in exchange for my thoughts on the book which I’ll share with you now…

Web Scripts are an essential part of Alfresco. If you are extending or customizing the platform and you have time to learn only one thing about it, web scripts might very well be that thing. The reason is that they are key to so much else you might want to do such as integrating Alfresco with a third party system or customizing Alfresco Share, which is, at its core, comprised of web scripts.

Most technical books on Alfresco give some attention to web scripts, but this one dives into the details. After reading it, you’ll know how to do simple things with web scripts and you’ll have some idea of how to do more complex work beyond understanding the Model-View-Controller basics.

While the comprehensiveness is a good thing, I think it also presents a bit of a challenge which comes down to this: Who is this book for? If it is for beginners, it needs a lot more examples and could cut back on a lot of the technical detail. If it is for experts, point to existing sources for the basics and drill deeper on the interesting technical topics.

I did see a couple of bad practices in the book. First, in the chapter on Java-backed web scripts (Ch. 6) the author provides an example Spring configuration XML file that injects the lower-cased Alfresco beans into the web script class. This may sound like a trivial nitpick, but it’s actually a big no-no that I see repeatedly. If you have good reason for using the unsecured, internal-only, lower-cased beans, explain it. Otherwise, stick to the public, secured, upper-cased beans so that beginners don’t pick up a bad habit.

Similarly, there is a part that discusses where web script files can live in the Alfresco WAR. The author does point out that the extension directory is “preferred” but I don’t think this is worded strongly enough. Those other locations should have been left out entirely or maybe it could have said, “Place your files only in the extension directory. While these other locations may technically work, you should never use them.”

I was happy to see the chapter on the Maven SDK and the discussion of AMPs. And I think putting the Eclipse details later was a good idea, as one of the features of web scripts is that you don’t have to use Java or an IDE of any kind if you don’t want to. The book doesn’t cover Surf, Aikau, or Share customization in any detail, and I think that was also a good decision as those areas are too fluid at the moment and because the singular focus on web scripts is one of the book’s assets.

Overall, Learning Alfresco Web Scripts is a very thorough and comprehensive treatment of an important technical topic for Alfresco developers.

Alfresco Community Edition needs sensible version labels

See if you can answer this question: What is the current stable release of Alfresco Community Edition?

Some of you probably blurted out “5.0”. But that’s not specific enough. Alfresco Community Edition releases have letters as part of the release name. Did I hear someone say “5.0.c”? That is certainly the latest version but is that the current stable release? I would argue that it’s not and that the correct answer to the question is actually “4.2.f”. That’s the newest version I would recommend to anyone wanting to run Community Edition in production.

The problem is that you can’t actually tell what is supposed to be the stable release by looking at the version labels like you can with virtually every other open source software project. Hindsight is actually the only tool we have. The reason 4.2.f is the latest stable release is because it was the last release in the 4.2 Community Edition code line. We won’t know which 5.0 release is the stable one until Alfresco stops creating 5.0 releases!

Really, 5.0.a, 5.0.b, and 5.0.c should be labeled 5.0-RC1, 5.0-RC2, and 5.0-RC3. I’m using RC for “Release Candidate” here because that’s basically what they are, but “snapshot” or “milestone” could also work. We just need something that indicates that, eventually, we’re going to see an end to the iterations and finally arrive on a stable release and that you should really wait to deploy to production until that stable release comes out.

If you look at 4.2, I think 4.2.e was the “final” release and then 4.2.f was a special release to address a serious security vulnerability. So 4.2, a, b, c, and d should have been “release candidates”, 4.2.e should have just been 4.2.0, and 4.2.f should have been 4.2.1. I wouldn’t expect the third digit, which normally signifies a “service pack” to be anything other than 0 for the vast majority of Community Edition releases. The 4.2.f release was an exception to the norm which is that Alfresco doesn’t provide service packs for CE.

The reason an easily identifiable release label is important is because today people in the community are going to the Alfresco download page and assuming that what they are downloading is a stable release. They are then installing and running that release in production. This leaves those people disappointed down the road when they find out they installed software with numerous known issues or partly-implemented features (I know those issues are often documented in the release notes and in Jira). The point is that downloaders, particularly newcomers, don’t have (and shouldn’t need) the insight that Alfresco releases don’t really settle down until the fourth iteration or so. That should be explicit.

The reason Alfresco doesn’t use “stable” to describe the release is partly commercial. The thinking is that doing so makes running the freely-available Community Edition in production seem less risky or even encouraged by the company that depends on revenue from the paid edition.

The other challenge is about process. I don’t think engineering always knows that a given Community Edition release is going to be the last one until after the fact.

Both of these could be addressed with a mindset change. Instead of “Let’s iterate on release X.0 until we’re ready to work on the next major release” the thinking ought to be, “Let’s drive toward a stable, production-ready X.0 release and once we think we have it, let’s call it that”.

I’ve heard chatter that Alfresco might, at some point, consider offering support for those running CE. Based on the number of SMB’s who have told me that Alfresco One is out-of-reach for them financially, there ought to be a strong demand for a low-priced subscription around Community Edition. If that happens, I assume both the mentality and the process around CE version labels will get cleaned up. But I hope we don’t have to wait.